Book Review: Pray Big

Prayer is an incredibly popular topic, likely because so many people struggle with it. When we sit down to pray, we don’t always know what to say or how to approach it at all. As a result, we have many works written to aid us in this area. Alistair Begg adds his voice to the long list in “Pray Big.”

“This book is not about a doctrine of prayer. It is not a whole theology of prayer… We are going to focus in on Paul’s prayers for his friends in the church in Ephesus,” Begg states in his introduction. The book focuses on these passages while drawing from multiple other places in scripture.

Begg speaks on what to pray, a little bit of what to say, and specifically to whom and for whom we pray. 8 chapters, an introduction and an epilogue make up the pages of this book. At the end of each chapter you can find a short, meaningful prayer pertaining to the topic. The chapters cover the dependent and spiritual nature of prayer, praying for focus, hope, riches, power, and love.

Some may see the title of chapter 5 “Pray for Riches” and express concern, but those who read it will find one of the richest chapters of the book, in my opinion. Begg writes on our great inheritance, and how the greatest gift of God is God.

The book is full of things one could add to their prayer life, to enhance or enrich it, but there are also things one might wish to rethink after reading, such as the use of the phrase “Be with so and so.” Begg explains it is unimaginative, limited, lacking in spiritual ambition.

“Pray Big” encourages us to pray for bigger, less material things. The author emphasizes that “All that matters may be brought before God, but we must always bring before God those things that matter most.”

Overall I found this to be a very beautiful, theologically informed book on prayer. Alistair Begg guides you through praying for bigger things than health and wealth and happiness — to be “filled with his fullness, to be able to grasp the unknowable love of Christ, to live for the treasures of your future inheritance.”


I received a copy of this book in exchange for my fair and honest review.

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